OVERVIEW

Womenswear

Wikipedia describes 1650-1700 fashion in Europe as:
“Characterized by rapid change. Following the end of the Thirty Years’ War and the Restoration of England’s Charles II, military influences in men’s clothing were replaced by a brief period of decorative exuberance which then sobered into the coat, waistcoat and breeches costume that would reign for the next century and a half. In the normal cycle of fashion, the broad, high-waisted silhouette of the previous period was replaced by a long, lean line with a low waist for both men and women. This period also marked the rise of the periwig as an essential item of men’s fashion.”
Elegant Couple in an Interior

Fig. 1 - Eglon van der Neer (Dutch, 1634-1703). Elegant Couple in an Interior, 1678. Oil on canvas; 85.5 x 70.1 cm (33.7 x 27.6 in). Hartford: Wadsworth Atheneum. Source: Pinterest

Judith

Fig. 2 - Eglon Hendrick van der Neer (Dutch, 1634-1703). Judith, 1678. Oil on Oak; 32 x 24.6 cm. London: The National Gallery, NG2535. Salting Bequest, 1910. Source: Pinterest

Mary Louise of Orleans, Queen of Spain

Fig. 3 - Jose Gacia Hidalgo (Spanish, 1646-1717). Mary Louise of Orleans, Queen of Spain, 1679. Oil on canvas; 96 x 68 cm (37.8 x 26 in). Source: Wikimedia

Princesse des Ursins, Anne Marie de La Tremoille

Fig. 4 - Anonymous. Princesse des Ursins, Anne Marie de La Tremoille, 1670. Oil on canvas; dimensions unknown. Source: Pinterest

Allegory of the Catholic Faith

Fig. 5 - Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632–1675). Allegory of the Catholic Faith, ca. 1670–72. Oil on canvas; 114.3 x 88.9 cm (45 x 35 in). New York: The Met, 32.100.18. Source: The Met

Menswear

[To come…]

Portrait of Maksymilian Franciszek Ossolinski and his sons

Fig. 1 - Artist unknown. Portrait of Maksymilian Franciszek Ossolinski and his sons, 1670-80. Oil on canvas; 211 × 110 cm. Warsaw: Warsaw Castle. Source: Pinterest

Jacques de Goyon III , Sire de Matignon, Comte de Thorigny

Fig. 2 - Henri Gascar (French, 1635-1701). Jacques de Goyon III , Sire de Matignon, Comte de Thorigny, 1675. Oil on canvas; dimensions unknown. Source: Pinterest

Paying the Hostess

Fig. 3 - Pieter de Hooch (Dutch, 1629–1684). Paying the Hostess, ca. 1670. Oil on canvas; 94.6 x 111.1 cm (37 1/4 x 43 3/4 in). New York: The Met, 58.144. Gift of Stuart Borchard and Evelyn B. Metzger, 1958. Source: The Met

CHILDREN’S WEAR

References:

Historical Context

Wikipedia: 1670-1679
Rulers:

Map of Europe, 1670. Source: RareMaps

Events:
  • 1675 – Under sumptuary laws protecting local markets, Charles II bans the import of French lace into England.
  • 1675-1710 – Christopher Wren’s St. Paul’s built
  • 1670s – Louis XIV, to disguise his growing baldness, promotes the fashion of wearing wigs.
  • Primary/Period Sources

    Resources for Fashion History Research

    To discover primary/period sources, explore the categories below.
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    Primary/Period Sources

    Secondary Sources

    Also see the 17th-century overview page for more research sources… or browse our Zotero library.

    Online

    Books/Articles
    Pinterest