OVERVIEW

Womenswear

Wikipedia describes 1650- 1700 in Western European fashion:

“The wide, high-waisted look of the previous period was gradually superseded by a long vertical line, with horizontal emphasis at the shoulder. Full, loose sleeves ended just below the elbow at mid century and became longer and tighter in keeping with the new trend. The body was tightly corseted, with a low, broad neckline and dropped shoulder. In later decades, the overskirt was drawn back and pinned up to display the petticoat, which was heavily decorated.

Spanish court fashion remained out of step with the fashions that arose in France and England, and prosperous Holland also retained its own modest fashions, especially in headdress and hairstyles, as it had retained the ruff in the previous period.”

BBC History Magazine describes dressing in the 17th century:

“A major attraction of London was the range of shopping opportunities. By Queen Elizabeth’s reign in the second half of the 16th century, merchants were importing a wide range of different fabrics, dyes and textiles which meant that clothes were becoming more diverse and colourful. Most of this linen and lace came from Italy and the Low Countries, but by the end of the 17th century more exotic commodities such as East Indian chintz and calicos were available too.”

Recueil des modes de la cour de France, 'Femme de qualité en habit D'esté'

Fig. 1 - Nicolas Arnoult (French, 1671-1700). Recueil des modes de la cour de France, 'Femme de qualité en habit D'esté', 1687. Hand-colored engraving on paper; 36.51 x 23.81 cm (14 3/8 x 9 3/8 in). Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, M.2002.57.69. Purchased with funds provided by The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Foundation, Mr. and Mrs. H. Tony Oppenheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Reed Oppenheimer, Hal Oppenheimer, Alice and Nahum Lainer, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Oppenheimer, Ricki and Marvin Ring, Mr. and Mrs. David Sydorick, the Costume Council Fund, and member of the Costume Council. Source: LACMA

Recueil des modes de la cour de France, 'Femme de qualité, en d'Eshabillé d'Esté'

Fig. 2 - Nicolas Arnoult (French, 1671-1700). Recueil des modes de la cour de France, 'Femme de qualité, en d'Eshabillé d'Esté', 1687. Hand-colored engraving on paper; 36.51 x 23.81 cm (14 3/8 x 9 3/8 in). Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, M.2002.57.116. Source: LACMA

Mary II when Princess of Orange

Fig. 3 - Willem Wissing (English, 1656–1687). Mary II when Princess of Orange, 1685. Oil on canvas; 125.7 × 101.9 cm (49.5 × 40.1 in). London: Royal Collection Trust, RCIN 404449. Source: Royal Collection

Portrait of a lady, half-length, in a richly embroidered lace dress with red sleeves, gold earrings, holding a pearled salver with jasmine flowers, in a sculpted cartouche

Fig. 4 - Cornelis Schut III (Flemish, 1629-1685). Portrait of a lady, half-length, in a richly embroidered lace dress with red sleeves, gold earrings, holding a pearled salver with jasmine flowers, in a sculpted cartouche, 1682. Oil on canvas; 126.3 x 98.8 cm (49¾ x 38 7/8 in). Private Collection. Source: Christie's

Evening dress

Fig. 4 - Designer Unknown. Evening dress, 1680s. Private Collection. Source: Pinterest

Menswear

[To come…]

Recueil des modes de la cour de France, 'Homme de qualité en habit D'esté'

Fig. 1 - Nicolas Arnoult (French, 1671-1700). Recueil des modes de la cour de France, 'Homme de qualité en habit D'esté', 1687. Hand-colored engraving on paper; 36.51 x 23.81 cm (14 3/8 x 9 3/8 in). Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, M.2002.57.107. Purchased with funds provided by The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Foundation, Mr. and Mrs. H. Tony Oppenheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Reed Oppenheimer, Hal Oppenheimer, Alice and Nahum Lainer, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Oppenheimer, Ricki and Marvin Ring, Mr. and Mrs. David Sydorick, the Costume Council Fund, and member of the Costume Council. Source: LACMA

Portrait of Francesco Albani

Fig. 2 - Attributed to Sempronio Subissati (Italian, 1680–1758). Portrait of Francesco Albani, 18th century. Red chalk, stumped in the portrait medallion, over traces of black chalk; 41.8 x 25.5 cm (16-7/16 x 10-1/16 in). New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1970.293. Gift of Victor Sordan, 1970. Source: The Met

Cosimo III de' Medici (1642–1723), Grand Duke of Tuscany

Fig. 3 - Giovanni Battista Foggini (Italian, Florence 1652–1725 Florence). Cosimo III de' Medici (1642–1723), Grand Duke of Tuscany, ca. 1680–82. Marble with base of gray marble; 99.4 × 78.7 × 42.9 cm, 177.4 kg (Overall (confirmed): 39 1/8 × 31 × 16 7/8 in., 391 lb.). New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1993.332.1. Purchase, The Annenberg Foundation Gift, 1993. Source: The Met

CHILDREN’S WEAR

References:

Historical Context

Wikipedia: 1680-1689
Rulers:

1680 Danckerts Europe. Source: Lahaina Printsellers

Events:
  • 1680 – Amsterdam opera at Leidsegracht opens
  • 1682- The city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is founded by William Penn.
  • 1682 – Newton’s theory of gravity.
  • 1683- The English crown colony of New York is subdivided into 12 counties.
  • 1683 – Turks halted at Vienna.
  • 1685 – Louis XIV revokes the Edict of Nantes, forcing large numbers of Huguenots to seek refuge in London. Importing their silk-weaving expertise, these escapees helped found the Spitalfields silk industry.
  • 1686 – The importation of chintz is banned in France (and 40 years later in England) to promote the interests of French and English wool mills.
  • 1688- The Nine Years’ Warbegins in Europe and America.
  • 1688 – John Locke’s Glorious Revolution.
  • Primary/Period Sources

    Resources for Fashion History Research

    To discover primary/period sources, explore the categories below.
    Have a primary source to suggest?  Or a newly digitized periodical/book to announce?  Contact us!

    Primary/Period Sources

    Secondary Sources

    Also see the 17th-century overview page for more research sources… or browse our Zotero library.

    Online

    Books/Articles
    Pinterest