Category: 19th century

For a brief overview, see the V&A's "Introduction to 19th-Century Fashion" and "History of Fashion, 1840-1900."

For more in-depth information, see the decade overviews and bibliographies below.

Decade Overviews

Bibliography

Have a source to suggest that you don't see here?  Contact us!

All

Accessories, Hair & Makeup

Cut & Construction

Exhibition & Museum Collection Catalogues

Fashion Designers

Industry & Consumerism

Menswear

Specialized Types of Dress

Surveys & General Overviews

Underwear

By Decade

Also see individual decade overviews above for more resources... or browse our Zotero Library.

1800-1809

1810-1819
1820-1829

1830-1839

1840-1849

1850-1859

1860-1869

1870-1879

1880-1889

1890-1899

Filmography

Have a film to suggest that you don't see here?  Contact us!

1800-1825

1825-1855

1855-1870

1870-1890

1890-1910

Entries to Date

1855

Women’s fashion was ornate above all else in 1855, with the hoop skirt reigning prominently in conjunction with brightly colored silks and satins accessorized with all varieties of tasteful trimmings.

1856

In 1856, women’s dresses were made mostly in silk, cotton, and velvet, and their silhouettes consisted of bodices fitted to the waist and full bell skirts that were accessorized with flounces, stripes, trims, and flowers.

1863

1863 saw the crinoline still reigning triumphant with full bell-shaped skirts and tiny, nipped-in corseted waists the ideal silhouette—in part due to the support of the French Empress Eugénie. In more avant-garde circles, some were beginning to abandon the crinoline.

1865

In 1865 the shape of the crinoline had shifted—flattening in the front, with greater fullness in the back. Blue, neutral, and striped fabrics were quite popular and often accented with contrasting trimmings.

1866

In 1866 belted dresses became quite fashionable—replacing the pointed bodices previously en vogue. Ribbon trimmings were preferred to artificial flowers.

1866 – Auguste Toulmouche, The Hesitant Fiancée

In The Hesitant Fiancée, Auguste Toulmouche steps away from his usual depiction of beautiful yet idle women Emile Zola described as “Toulmouche’s delicious dolls.” He refines his style by painting a more complex subject–one of an arranged marriage that the bride clearly rebels against, as evidenced by the subject’s direct gaze. Despite the shift of the subject matter, Toulmouche keeps to his standard of painting lavish gowns and luxurious backdrops.

Loading

Recent Essays

Twitter

Instagram